Drill Chuck Key Sizes Chart

After purchasing a hand drill, the most crucial step is to choose an adequate chuck size and key. Not everyone requires the same size chucks. Professionals and non-professionals require varying chuck sizes depending on their work.

Obtaining a chuck key by measuring the drill chuck size usually refers to drill chucks found on mass-produced ‘generic type’ hand-held drills. A general 1/2′′ (13mm) drill chuck key, for example, will fit a generic 1/2′′ (13mm) drill chuck. Some generic chuck keys may be loose, while others may fit snugly.

This isn’t always the case with more particular drill types (non-generic).Because there are so many manufacturers of chuck keys, you need to ensure you purchase the best drill chucks.

They appear simple, yet they still have the same manufacturing as the devices themselves. With chuck keys, you’ll find the soft steel handles limit any potential for dangerous fracturing under excessive load as you tighten the drill chuck. It’s easy to experience dangerous fracturing when trying to loosen the chuck after your drill hasn’t been used for ages.

Drill Chuck Key Different Sizes

In our guide, you can learn more about a chuck key size and also how to find the right one from DIY supplies stores using our drill chuck size chart. (Read Allen Key Sizes Chart)

By the end, you’ll find the chart may come from various manufacturers, such as Jacobs (used in our examples) yet the leverage you get, and the chuck key sizes remain the same.

How Do You Size A Drill Chuck?

Key

After purchasing a drill machine, the most crucial step is to choose an adequate chuck size and key. Not everyone requires the same size chucks.

Professionals and non-professionals require varying sizes of chucks depending on the type of work they do.

Getting a chuck key by measuring the drill chuck size usually refers to drill chucks that are installed on mass-produced ‘generic type’ hand-held drills.

A general 1/2′′ (13mm) drill chuck key, for example, will fit a generic 1/2′′ (13mm) drill chuck. Some generic chuck keys may be a little slack, while others may fit snugly.

This isn’t always the case with more particular drill types (non-generic).

Generic Chuck Keys

InchesMetric
1/4″6.5mm
3/8″10mm
1/2″13mm
5/8″16mm
3/4″20mm

Drill Chuck Size:

For non-generic drill chucks, the drill chuck size is highly important (see the section above on “Generic Chuck Keys”).

There is one of two or three criteria for selecting a chuck key for non-generic chuck keys.

  • Do you know the brand of your drill Chuck?
  • Are there markings on the drill chuck?
  • Is there a reference number you can search for?
  • Is this a reference to a chuck key?
  • Do you know your drills brand and model number?

The markings on the drill chuck can mean a lot of things, but they can also lead you to the answer:

Check the drill or drill chuck manufacturer’s website for any data sheets that detail the drill specifications.

Important:

A drill chuck made by a different manufacturer is sometimes used on a drill.

The drill chuck marks almost always pertain to the drill chuck alone. Use these details to determine the chuck key you’ll require.

Nothing is more aggravating than misplacing your drill’s chuck key. Purchase a new chuck if you’ve misplaced yours.

  1. Look closely at the engraved numbers on the drill’s chuck. The chuck size is something like 1/4, 1/2, 1/2, and so on.
  2. Use a ruler and measure the diameter of the hole in the side of the chuck in inches. The pilot shank is the name for this measurement.
  3. To make your selection, take these dimensions to your local hardware store.

How Many Drill Chuck Key Sizes Are There?

There are over 12 different chucks, so know what you’re looking for before deciding.

Identifying the Size of Drill Chuck Key

What is Chuck Size?

If you own a drill, or have done some internet research, you’ve probably come across the term chuck size. It specifies the maximum diameter of the shank that holds the chuck. (Learn How To Remove A Broken Key From A Lock)

Shanks can be hexagonal or straight. The flats of a hexagonal shank are measured. A straight shank is measured from any point along its circumference.

The capacity of a chuck refers to the distance between the chuck and the open jaws, which refers to the drill’s maximum shaft length.

When purchasing drill bits, you must consider both the size and the capacity. If the chuck is going to hold the bit, it’s self-evident that the bit must match the chuck’s size and capacity; it’s as easy as that.

Chuck Size You Need?

After you’ve figured out what chuck size means, the following step is to figure out what chuck size you’ll need.

Chuck, however, does not come in a wide range of sizes. There are just two sizes available. Regardless of whether you need to work with a small or huge bit, you only have two possibilities.

For smaller bits, a chuck size of 10mm (about 3/8 inch) is employed. The 13mm or 12-inch chuck is for larger bits.

More specifically, if you need a larger bit, you’ll need a larger shank; in this example, you’ll need a chuck with a 13mm shank. However, if you prefer a lower bit size that necessitates a smaller shank, you can use an 11mm chuck.

How to Size Chuck Key?

In three easy steps, you can decide the size of the chuck key that best fits your chunk.

First, check the chuck for any engraved numerals. The numbers will be in the range of 1/2, 1/4, 1/4, and so on.

Then, using a ruler, determine the diameter of the chuck hole. The pilot shank is what it’s called.

Take note of the bit size and the diameter of the chuck hole, then go to your local hardware store and give the salesman these data. He’ll locate an appropriate key for the chuck for you.

Installing Drill Chuck

It’s now time to connect the drill machine to a chuck. Before you go any further, you must first know the sort of chuck you have.

You must first open the jaws and inspect the chuck’s base. To see clearly, you might need a flashlight. Find an appropriate wrench to remove the screws if there are any at the bottom of the chuck. You can continue with this process if you locate screws.

Remove Old Chuck

You must first remove the screws before removing the chuck. Rotate the screw clockwise with a screwdriver or wrench while gripping the chuck firmly with your other hand to remove the set screw.

This is a simple task that can be carried out with an Allen wrench. Tighten the screwdriver’s short side into the chuck. If the drill has two speeds, the low speed should be selected with the flip switch. If the machine has a chuck clutch, make sure it’s set to the highest level.

Furthermore, the drill direction indication should be set forward.

With your left hand, place the machine firmly on a table. Point a 45-degree angle with the Allen wrench and make sure it’s facing your body. After that, strike the wrench with a hammer.

The chuck has been disconnected from the spindle. Counterclockwise rotate the spindle.

Install New Chuck

After removing the old chuck from the spindle, take measurements to find a chuck that fits. Set the position of the chuck’s threads on the spindle now. Then spin it clockwise until your hand is tightened by the spindle. (Read Microwave Sizes Chart)

Screw the nuts and bolts into the hole at the chuck’s base and tighten them into position after opening the jaws of the chuck.

How Do I Identify A Drill Chuck Key?

Chuck Key Features

  • Thumb Grip Styles in Nickel Improve Leverage and User Comfort.
  • Under Excessive Load, Soft Steel Handles Reduce the Risk of Dangerous Fracturing.
  • Key Disengagement After Tightening is Ensured with Self-Ejecting Models with Spring-Loaded Ejectors.
  • Chuck Key Handles should never be used with extensions, pliers, wrenches, or ‘cheaters’ of any kind.
  • Hammer or other impact blows should not be used on Chuck Key Handles.

What Size Is My Drill Chuck?

Drill Chuck, Chuck Key, or Pilot Hole Dimensions: This looks to be the most accurate way of chuck key sizing (other than knowing the specific chuck key reference number).

You should, however, cross-reference / integrate this measurement with the other data/measurements you have on hand.

You can measure the hole size with a caliper. Remember to account for any flat edges on the measuring jaws of the caliper, since this will result in a slightly erroneous (under-sized) reading. You might also use a drill bit to determine the pilot hole size.

Several of the pilot hole sizes are expressed as a fraction of an inch. If necessary, use an online converting tool.

  • Using a Drill to Measure the Chuck Key Pilot Hole. 16mm Pillar Drill Chuck
  • Using a Caliper to Measure the Chuck Key Pilot Hole

The physical dimensions of the chuck key are as follows:
Some vendors will supply you with general dimensions to compare, such as:

  • Dimensions: Length x Width x Height (L x W x H).
  • The number of teeth you have.
  • The gear teeth’s outside diameter.

Is it simply a matter of measuring what you can on the original chuck key (if you have one) and the chuck itself to see if anything matches up with the supplier’s information?

Drill Chuck Keys  
Pilot Size (inch)Used onType of key
1/80 SeriesT-Handle
1/80 Series StainlessT-Handle
5/321 SeriesT-Handle
5/321 Series StainlessT-Handle
1/42 seriesThumb Handle
5/163, 34 series and 14NThumb Handle
5/1634-33 CThumb Handle
3/836,16N, 18NThumb Handle
7/1620NT-Handle
7/327 SeriesThumb Handle
15/6431 Series and 8-1/2NThumb Handle
1/432, 33 Series & 11NThumb Handle
9/32DC8, SM8, 74K, 22BA, 23BA, 24BA, 26BA, 29-33T-Handle
9/32DC8, SM8, 74K, 22BA, 23BA, 24BA, 26BA, 29-33L-Handle
1/41/4” & 3/8” Multi-Craft®T-Handle
1/41/4” & 3/8” Multi-Craft® (black handle)T-Handle
1/41/4” & 3/8” Multi-Craft®L-Handle

Drill Chuck Key Sizes Chart

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